Cliches to avoid when writing a business

John Doe had been sleeping like the dead when his alarm clock screamed like a Banshee at him. His eyelids were as heavy as lead as he wracked his brain for excuses. It had been the mother of all lost weekends. Now he had to pay the piper--he'd missed Core again, and the hand of doom was heavy upon his grade in the class.

Cliches to avoid when writing a business

Subscribe to our FREE email newsletter and download free character development worksheets! We need to weigh their suitability as subjects for fiction, and then figure out how to go about making use of them. Here are 10 tips to help you do just that.

This article is about cliched themes, not phrases.

cliches to avoid when writing a business

If you want to learn about cliche phrases that all writers should avoid, check out these cliche examples. Our own private thoughts, dreams, intuitions and fantasies are inevitably colored by what psychiatrist Carl Jung called the collective unconscious—the vast, reservoir-like body of shared human experiences and of myths, symbols and legends.

Most sensational subjects have been treated to death. Steer clear of tired plots and you, your characters and your readers will avoid all kinds of heartache. Resist The Lure of the Sensational For beginning and experienced writers alike, the temptation to choose intrinsically dramatic subjects is hard to resist.

Drug deals and busts gone wrong, kidnapping, abortion, car crashes, murder, madness, rape, war—with such sensational raw material to work with, how can writers go wrong? They can and they do. A common stereotype is that of the starving artist.

Character Worksheets

This, after all, is the reality for many professional fine artists. Even poor Vincent van Gogh, that most depraved and deprived of artists, fails to live up to the image.

True, he often went hungry, and he suffered from incapacitating seizures. But the cartoon of the foaming madman does him no justice. But as with most things in life, you tend to get what you pay for. Our stories should be stories that only we can tell, as only we can tell them. Keep it Real by Taking it Slow My favorite exercise is to ask my students to write two pieces, one at a time, each about a minute long.

Program 1: Getting Your Message Across Effectively

Piece 1 should rivet the reader; Piece 2 should bore the reader stiff. Each student reads both pieces out loud. There are several reasons for this. In their effort to grip us, beginning writers tend to rush: They equate their own adrenaline with that of the reader.

And—to their consternation—the result mesmerizes. At any rate it holds our attention. But far worse than rushing, in trying to interest us, most writers abandon sincerity and, with it, authenticity.Cliches drive me bonkers, especially when it comes to writing.

They are boring and abused and about as fun to read as the instruction manual of a Dustbuster. Writing is supposed to be a creative process, and there’s nothing creative in rehashing some trite phrase that is so old it was probably. Many students trip over common obstacles in their college application essays.

For example, many students can’t see beyond the superficial prompt to construct an essay that positively communicates their personality and passion. Fantasy Fiction Clichés to Avoid - What Beginners Do in Fantasy Fiction [First, my profound apologies to the vast majority of readers who don't steal content, but I have to state the following.

Return to Writing Romance · Print/Mobile-Friendly Version. While romance novels aren't always as clichéd as their critics claim, there are still some clichés that linger.

Just because something is clichéd, that doesn't mean it won't sell -- many of these clichés can be found on the new arrival shelves. By Jeff Haden Contributing editor, Inc. @jeff_haden. Now, when the word pops up in everyday business conversation, the person using it just sounds, well, pretentious.

Business-speak. The fact that the jargon of the business world is often annoying is the least of its problems. If there’s one trait business writing needs to have, it’s clarity—which is the trait most business jargon phrases completely lack.

Helping you write with Heart